Alex Crowe

Class Description I Monday Night Improvisation I 20 November 2017

Beginning with gentle relaxation into wakeful responsiveness, Alex’s classes usually circle around the integration of impulse and compositional sensibility, and explore how body, imagination and feeling states can be interdependent sources of material, including in embodied sound and language. Main influences include Skinner Releasing Technique, Action Theater, Suprapto Suryodarmo and clown work.

Biography

Alex Crowe is a performer and performance maker working mainly in movement based theatre.

Improvisation is an important part of his practice, both in research and as a performance form. His approach is informed by study of classical and contemporary dance; Skinner Releasing Technique, of which he is a certified teacher (www.skinnerreleasingnetwork.org/teachers/alex-crowe); American choreographer Stephanie Skura; Ruth Zaporah’s 'Action Theatre'; and by extended study of environmental and ritual art with Suprapto Suryodarmo in Java and with Sandra Reeve in the UK. His work also draws on a variety of approaches to physical theatre, including clowning. He holds an MA in Performance Making from Goldsmiths College, and teaches movement, improvisation and performance in both Higher Education and community settings. His exploration and practice of embodiment also encompasses Rosen Method Bodywork (www.alexcrowe-rosen.co.uk).

“As I seek to integrate the disparate influences I draw on within my practice, I am continually drawn back to the question of how a deeply felt somatic connection with body and imagination can manifest clearly in space and time, and in relationship to others, so that it is readable. What different kinds of awarenesses and intention need to be cultivated to achieve this? What happens when there is an intention to communicate - when we find ourselves in front of an audience?

A recurrent preoccupation is embodied language: the moving body as a source for linguistic meaning which goes beyond the limitations of our usual patterns of thinking and conceptualising; and how poetic aspects of language can speak directly to the performer's body, generating unexpected material.”

http://www.skinnerreleasingnetwork.org/teachers/alex-crowe